New Year, New Writer

 

 

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Recently on the news, a BBC reporter claimed that full-time writers earn an average of £11,000 per annum. That’s a meagre amount in the expensive world of today. How then are writers supposed to fend for themselves? Pay their bills and still find that special muse that would inspire them to keep writing.

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It’s simple.  If you’re not a world renowned author earning hundreds of thousands of pounds in royalty a year, then you need to diversify or reinvent yourself. Don’t stop writing, but do something else related to writing that would bring in some cash.

Do you love speaking in public? Research and find out how to earn money teaching others how to write.  Several universities are keen to pay authors to lecture their creative students. Also, there are tons of informative articles on the internet on how to earn extra cash and write at the same time.

 

There are some charity organisations that help professional writers in financial difficulties. Here in the UK, we have the Royal Literary Fund. They help writers who have commercially published several works of fiction; however, self-published authors are excluded from the grant.

You can email eileen.gunn@rlf.org.uk, to find out more or better still call this number, 020 7353 7159. If you prefer writing letters, then address it to Eileen Gunn, Chief Executive, Royal Literary Fund, 3 Johnson’s Court, Off Fleet Street. London. EC4A 3EA.

There is the possibility that you may not need the RLF to survive the financial hardship that may cripple your ambition or your dreams, there is another thing you can do.

Don’t ever give up! And, don’t stop writing or reading. Stephen King once wrote these golden words:

”If you want to be a writer, you must do two things above all others: read a lot and write a lot. There’s no way around these two things, and no shortcut.”

Happy New Year to the New You!

Alexandra David.

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